Past IDERD Award Recipients 2018

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Portrait photo of Amorell Saunders N'Daw

Amorell Saunders N’Daw

Director of Governance, UTSC
Assistant Secretary of the Governing Council
University of Toronto

Amorell Saunders N’Daw is a warrior woman who believes in disrupting spaces to effect change.

At the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC), in 2017, she served as Interim Senior Advisor, Equity and Diversity. Senior administrators acknowledged her thoughtful, compassionate leadership on equity issues and sound advice and direction based on years of experience in the field.

Amorell played an important role in helping the campus develop a clear strategy and framework for equity and diversity at UTSC and was credited with making UTSC a more equitable institution.

During her 11 years at UTSC, the campus community has always sought out Amorell’s advice, counsel and mentoring. She is known for generously giving of her time, energy and expertise to assist the UTSC community to address issues of equity, diversity and inclusion in ways that make the environment more supportive and enriching.

One of her most significant accomplishments with respect to equity, diversity and inclusion and the addressing of anti-racism issues is the creation of the affinity group, Connections and Conversations. Amorell played an instrumental role in the development of the support group for racialized administrative staff at U of T and has worked with colleagues to ensure there are mechanisms and processes in place to provide support to racialized staff, to offer advice and direction around effective programs and initiatives and to help advance the University’s commitment to equity.

Amorell’s commitment to equity and anti-racism is grounded in her desire to help uplift colleagues so that they can be their best selves at work, home and play.

Amorell advances anti-racism by playing an instrumental role in the development of the support group Connections and Conversations for racialized administrative staff at U of T and working with colleagues to ensure there are mechanisms and processes in place to provide support to racialized staff, to offer advice and direction around effective programs and initiatives and to help advance the University’s commitment to equity.

Portrait photo of Janelle Joseph

Dr. Janelle Joseph

Director of Academic Success and Assistant Director, Transitional Year Programme
University of Toronto

Dr. Janelle Joseph is an educator, researcher, published author, and academic administrator committed to anti-racist academic discourse and activism at the University of Toronto. In her scholarly work and teaching, Janelle examines the joys and complexities of Afro-diaspora cultures, multiculturalism, and experiences of discrimination in recreational, educational, and criminal justice settings. Her newest book “Sport in the Black Atlantic,” highlights the transnational experiences of Caribbean Canadians and gathered stories that had previously received very little academic exposure or theoretical understanding.

Her support of many University of Toronto multi-partner anti-racism initiatives, including the Health Sciences Summer Mentorship Program and Hurdle to Success, started in 2013. She has explored the experiences of racialized and Indigenous athletes, coaches and students and created a critical document on which the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education based its current Task Force on Race and Indigeneity. She played a vocal role as presenter and facilitator in many symposia leading up to this Task Force on the St. George and UTSC campuses, and discussed the issues with colleagues across Canada in a CIUT Radio Broadcast of Hart House Conversations.

Through her previous roles as a Learning Strategist and now as the Director of Academic Success and Assistant Director at the Transitional Year Programme, Dr. Joseph demonstrates a commitment not only to supporting Black and Indigenous students to access postsecondary education by exposing the hidden curriculum, but also to shifting dominant cultures to that students can exist on campuses where they are supported by greater numbers of Indigenous and racialized faculty and staff.

Janelle advances anti-racism by supporting many University of Toronto multi-partner anti-racism initiatives, including the Health Sciences Summer Mentorship Program and Hurdle to Success. She has also explored the experiences of racialized and Indigenous athletes, coaches and students and created a critical document on which the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education based its current Task Force on Race and Indigeneity.

Portrait photo of Marie Laing

Marie Laing

Candidate for M.A., Social Justice Education
OISE, University of Toronto

Marie is a queer Mohawk scholar of mixed Haudenosaunee and Irish/Scottish/South African settler ancestry. Her family comes from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory, and she belongs to the turtle clan. Marie grew up in Kingston, Ontario before moving to Toronto to pursue her bachelor’s degree here at UofT. She is currently completing her M.A. in Social Justice Education at OISE.

As an organizer on campus, Marie has taken leadership roles in the planning of many on-campus events that challenge white supremacy through collaborative, inclusive, and accessible education on anti-Indigenous racism, including the Standing Rock Syllabus Reading Group and the State Violence and Indigenous Resistance film screening series.

As a member of OISE’s Indigenous Education Network, Marie works collaboratively with Indigenous and non-Indigenous community members to increase the presence and vitality of Indigenous education at OISE, and is working on the creation of an archive commemorating the organization’s 30-year history and impact on the University.

As a scholar, Marie’s thesis research centres on the experiences of young trans, two-spirit and queer Indigenous people and the ways in which they use and understand the term two-spirit.

Marie advances anti-racism by taking leadership roles in the planning of on-campus events that challenge white supremacy through collaborative, inclusive, and accessible education on anti-Indigenous racism and by working collaboratively with Indigenous and non-Indigenous community members to increase the presence and vitality of Indigenous education at OISE.

Portrait photo of Roy Strebel

Roy Strebel

SOAR Indigenous and Equity Initiatives Coordinator,
Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education
University of Toronto

Roy Strebel, Anishinaabe, Thessalon First Nation, Bear Clan. Roy began his academic career as a mature student. Roy has been active on the Native Student’s Association, service as their Bear Clan leader. Roy has maintained the Kahnontake Kitkan Garden for many years, providing tours, growing traditional medicines and creating space for ceremony.

Currently Roy serves the Faculty of Kinesiology Physical Education as their SOAR Indigenous and Equity Initiatives Coordinator. The SOAR program provides high school aged youth (grade 9-12) an immersive experiential learning experience. In this role Roy will assist with the co-ordination of on site coordinators and volunteers, ensuring safety of all participants.

Roy serves on many committees supporting Indigenous peoples. These include The Decanal Working Group on Indigenous Teaching and Learning, The committee that became The Elders Speak”: Maamwi / Misiway Wanikan: All Together Elders Symposium. Roy has been the recipient of numerous awards including; Dr. Lillian McGregor Aboriginal Award of Excellence, the Indigenous Students Bursary Fund, & Outstanding Aboriginal Student in Community Engaged Learning. Roy has also received grants from; Indspire, Woodsworth College, Thessalon First Nations House & Miziwe Biik Employment & Training, etc.

Roy advances anti-racism by serving as the Bear Clan leader for the Native Student’s Association, by maintaining the Kahnontake Kitkan Garden and creating space for ceremony, providing high-school-aged youth (grade 9-12) an immersive experiential learning experience, and by serving on many committees supporting Indigenous peoples.

Members of the Black Medical Students' Association pose for a group photo in the Medical Sciences Building

Black Medical Students’ Association (BMSA)

University of Toronto

The Black Medical Students’ Association (BMSA) is a Medical Society affiliated club run by pre-clerkship students at University of Toronto, established in 2000. Our mission is support and encourage students from communities that are under-represented in medicine, primarily students from African and Caribbean backgrounds. We aim to assist these students to become successful medical school applicants through student outreach events, resource dissemination, mentorship and community building.

The Black Medical Students’ Association (BMSA) advances anti-racism by supporting and encouraging students from communities that are under-represented in medicine, primarily students from African and Caribbean backgrounds.